MUSE.

The Sculpture Company
ROYAL ASCOT 2019

Featured Works for Ascot 2019

Tom Hiscocks, Drinking Horse

Tom Hiscocks - Drinking Horse, 2018
Copper & Mirror Polished Steel on Portland Stone
2.5m x 1.5m x 1.5m

Shadow of the Dune
by Anne Curry
Bronze World Edition of 9
115cm x 190cm x 165cm

Evocation of Speed
by Judy Boyt
Bronze World Edition of 8
72cm x 64cm x 20cm

Peregrine
by Geoffery Dashwood
Bronze World Editoin of 6
305cm x 360cm

Indomitable by Nick Bibbly
‍Bronze Edition of
230cm x 110cm x 94cm

Tom Hiscocks - Free Movement at Royal Ascot with Muse

Tom Hiscocks - Free Movement
Stainless Steel
300cm x 185cm x 70cm

Ammonite
by Hamish Mackie
Bronze World Edition 9
134cm x 178cm

Running Fallow Buck
by Hamish Mackie
Bronze World Edition of 12
160cm x 160cm x 56cm

Standing Fallow Buck
by Hamish Mackie
Bronze World Edition of 12
162cm x 158cm x 60cm

Old Man of the Forest
by Nick Bibby
Bronze Edition of 12
70cm x 105cm x 94cm

Sculpture in the Royal Enclosure Gardens
Royal Ascot Sculpture Gallery

We are honoured and delighted to yet again present the very best in British sculpture at the very finest British event.

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Anne Curry

Anne discovered the power of sculpture while working for a doctorate in Egyptology at Oxford University. “I see in the sculpture of Ancient Egypt the perfect combination of material, line, volume and tension.” Clean lines and inner energy are the fundamental principles of her work.

Anne remains fascinated by the development of natural forms and their patterns.  The curves, spirals of growth, the unfolding of leaves and flowers, the bursting of seed pods all imply controlled movement, a disciplined and mathematical progression, but all displaying an immense internal energy.

This close observation is at the core of Anne’s monumental sculpture,combined with clean lines and pared down detail. The pieces she creates have taken shape in her mind’s eye over a period of months, often years.

Her garden sculptures have been exhibited at Newby Hall in Yorkshire, Levens Hall in Cumbria, Sir Harold Hillier Gardens in Hampshire, Painswick Rococo Gardens in Gloucestershire, Burghley House Sculpture Garden in Lincolnshire, West Lavington Manor in Wiltshire, at the Duin and Kruidberg Estate in Santpoort in the Netherland and at The Royal Meeting Ascot , 2018 / 2019 

Collections include ;·        
Donghu International Public Art Park, Wuhan, China
House of Commons, London
Tribunal de Commerce, Paris
Pembroke College, Oxford
The Union,Oxford
Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, Regimental Museum, Stirling Castle
Newby Hall,North Yorkshire
Levens Hall,Cumbria
The Earl and Countess of Wessex
Baron Alainde Condé, Bordeaux
Comte and Comtesse Christian Dadvisard, Brussels
Lord and Lady Heseltine
Lord Jenkins of Hillhead
Sir John and Dame Norma Major
Lord and Lady Plumb  

In 2017 Anne exhibited at the Venice Biennale in “Personal Structures” with the GAA Foundation

Geoffery Dashwood

Geoffrey Dashwood was born in Hampshire, England in 1947.At the age of fifteen he won a scholarship to study fine art at Southampton College of Art, but left after a brief period, preferring to study directly from nature.

He worked in varied occupations to support himself and experimented in various art mediums and techniques in his spare time. His last employment was with the Forestry Commission where he was engaged as a keeper in the New Forest. He also became the unofficial artist in residence for his employers. Dashwood left the Forestry Commission in his mid-twenties to pursue a freelance career in art and he soon received commissions for illustrations and design work, whilst concurrently drawing and painting independently.

In the 1980s Dashwood discovered a gift and a passion for sculpture. His earliest works were small, highly realistic studies in the mainstream of traditional English wildlife art and comparable in style to the famous 19th century French Animalier School of Sculpture. Although these early works brought him commercial success, he became increasingly dissatisfied with the constraints of realism and the lack of personal expression the genre afforded him.

Dashwood started to experiment with larger life-size and monumental works and began to eliminate all superfluous details, creating boldly modelled pieces. He refined his sculptures to attain smooth, tactile,pure forms, further enhanced in bronze by the application of coloured and multi-coloured patinas. In these sculptures he combined his own aesthetic ideals, establishing a distinctive style which is now internationally recognised as being quintessentially Dashwood. His affinity for and empathy with birds and his unique ability to express these emotions to others through his sculpture is undisputed. Dashwood’s work is exhibited and collected worldwide.

Dashwood is simply an artist in and of his time, formed by his own particular experience and getting on with his work. The point rather is that an innate sympathy of approach suggests itself inescapably in his work, in the simplicity of the principle forms and the natural authority with which they are resolved together, movement set against stability to create an imaginative dynamic that would be as real and alive whether the image were a hawk or no more than a block on a column.

All art is abstract, only some more some less. For the artist, the trick is only to establish the balance and proportion appropriate to himself, by the terms he sets himself in the work. With his birds Dashwood does just that.

William Packer - Art Critic Financial Times

National & Private Collections Include

Her Majesty The Queen, The Royal Collection, Sandringham,UK
Sascha M Rockefeller, USA
Mr & Mrs O Kelly Anderson, USA
The Leonard Andrews Museum, Pennsylvania, USA
Mr & Mrs Anson McC Beard, jr. USA
The Duke of Boxborough, Floors Castle, Scotland, UK
Lord Derwent, UK
Oleg Derev, Moscow, Russia
Linda Schuler and Richard Donner, USA
Mr & Mrs Walter A Eberstalt, USA
Mr & Mrs Stuart Engs, USA
The Financial Services Authority, Canary Whalf, London,UK
Frogmore Ltd, London, UK
The Gana Art Collection, Seoul, Korea
Lady Getty, UK
The London Golf Club, Kent, UK
William Gredley, Cambridge, UK
Ben Ali Haggin, USA
The international Centre for Wildlife Art, WallsworthHall, Gloucestershire, UK
The Koch Collection, New York, USAJ
Jazz Johnson Merton, USA
The Yves Micheli Collection, Geneva, Switzerland
The National Museum of Wildlife Art, Jackson Hole,Wyoming, USA
Oxford University, UK
Mrs. Kerry Packer, Australia
Perenco Ltd, Paris, France
DLJ Phoenix Ltd, Corporate Collection, London, UK
The Rare Bird Club, London, UK
Rice University, Houston, Texas, USA
The Joel Schur Collection, New York, USA
The Scottish Seabird Centre, North Berwick, Scotland, UK
Mrs William Shay, USA
The Honourable and Mrs Alan K Simpson, USA
The Honourable John W Warner, USA
Sir Kyffin Williams RA - bequest to The National Museumof Wales
Mr Eli M Wilner, New York, USA
The Worrell Collection, Virginia, USA

Click to View Larger Image
Muse the Sculpture Company at Royal Ascot with  Geoffery DashwoodMuse the Sculpture Company at Royal Ascot with  Geoffery DashwoodMuse the Sculpture Company at Royal Ascot with  Geoffery Dashwood

Peregrine by Geoffery Dashwood
Bronze World Editoin of 6
305cm x 360cm

Geoffrey Dashwood certainly knows his birds in the character of their every quirk and gesture, and perhaps there are those of a more literal cast of mind who would neither see or would wish to see any further or deeper into his work. Yet even to them, their responses to his birds could only be as deeply satisfying as they are, by being so formally resolved and accomplished even before any quality of description begins. Which means, to put it another way, that in their essence as works of art, they are very abstract indeed.

Dashwood is simply an artist in and of his time, formed by his own particular experience and getting on with his work. The point rather is that an innate sympathy of approach suggests itself inescapably in his work, in the simplicity of the principle forms and the natural authority with which they are resolved together, movement set against stability to create an imaginative dynamic that would be as real and alive whether the image were a hawk or no more than a block on a column.

All art is abstract, only some more some less. For the artist, the trick is only to establish the balance and proportion appropriate to himself, by the terms he sets himself in the work. With his birds Dashwood does just that.

William Packer - Art Critic Financial Times

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Hamish Mackie

British wildlife sculptor Hamish Mackie has had the privilege of observing wildlife in many corners of the world at first hand. “Observing animals in their own environment, in their natural habitat, is essential to understanding the subject’s physical and instinctive traits. For example, the disposition of a captive predator is very different from that of a predator the wild,” he says. This close observation, often involving intense research trips and sculpting from life in the field, informs Hamish’s whole approach to his work, which resonates with his passion for the natural world.

His bronze wildlife sculptures capture instinctive moments of animal behaviour but are his own interpretation, not merely photographic representations. Hamish manages to convey the inner core, strength and grace of his subject. Largely self-taught, his style is unique – he frequently works in spontaneous, often unrepeatable, fluid gestures with a confidence born from many years of mastering his craft. This assertive handling of his materials, coupled with an acute understanding of anatomy,results in strong, dynamic, ‘living’ sculptures.

“It is close observation of my subject’s behaviour that really brings my pieces to life. I want to convey a sense of character, their spirit. This determines how I handle my material – in a loose fluid manner or in a tighter, more controlled way; with large sweeping strokes, or with smaller detail. A sculpture should have its own power. I want the viewer to feel an emotional response.” (Hamish Mackie)

Born in 1973, Hamish Mackie grew up on a livestock farm in Cornwall, England. In the kitchen of the family farm,there still hangs his first bronze sculpture – a calf’s head he made at the age of 12 as a Christmas present for his father. He attended Radley College and Falmouth School of Art, before going on to study design at Kingston University.He began sculpting full time in 1996. Hamish has works in public and private collections around the world. His sculptures are cast in bronze or silver as limited editions, each signed, dated and numbered. Each sculpture takes on average four months to be sculpted, moulded and then cast in bronze using the lost wax method. It is a highly skilled, labour-intensive process.

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Judy Boyt



Her largest bronze sculpture,‘Rebellion’, (twice life size bronze horse) commissioned by Standard Life, is sited on top of his 100ft tower, East India House Offices, Middlesex Street,City of London.

Other notable public sculptures include ‘Evocation of Speed’ for Epsom and Ewell Borough Council, the large equine sculpture ‘Up to the Line’ for Red Row Developments, sited in the headquarters of Centrica, Windsor, and ‘Golden Miller’ sited at Cheltenham racecourse.

Judy designed and made the world famous Mitsubishi Motors silver trophy for prestigious Badminton Horse Trials.

Although the animal world features largely in Judy’s sculptures, the human figure is also becoming part of her extensive portfolio. She has sculpted a number of military figures for private and military clients, including a larger than life size Dutch Marine for their HQ in Dorn, The Netherlands.
 Judy Boyt is a sculptor with a passion for the natural world. Her strong observational initial drawings are translated into sculpture using the 3D metal armatures as the ‘drawn line’.This is where the energy, character and spirit of the sculpture starts. She works from the ‘inside out’- the dynamics of the skeletal structure, adding the flesh and muscle, to the final skin layer - creating a sculpture that has presence and a soul, capturing the living essence in the final metal cast. “I want the sculptures to speak and have that energy that will excite the observer. I want to recreate the soul and power.”

Private Collections Include

The British Royal Family
The Sultan of Bruneii HH.
HH. The President of the United Arab Emirates
Sheikh Hamdan al Maktoum.
The Hon. Nicholas Soames MP
The Duke of Roxburghe
The Late Lord Westbury
The Earl and Countess De Le Warr
The Late Major ‘Dick’ Hern
Lord Oaksey
John Dunlop
Jane Seymour
Mr & Mrs Alec Wildenstein
Mrs Tommy Wallis
Mr B Holliday
Mrs J Beckwith
Amanda Skiffington
Mrs N Corner
Mr and Mrs P Finn
Mrs S A York

Awards Include

The Royal British Sculptors (RBS) Medal; The Sculpture of Outstanding Merit in London awarded for her equestrian  bronze “Rebellion” commissioned by RBS.

The British Sporting Art Award for Sculpture – “Katarino” commissioned by Robert Waley Cohen.

The British Sporting Art Trust Award for Sculpture – “The Violettas”   2 donkey heads.

The British Sporting Art Trust Award – “Evocation of Speed”, Epsom

Sladmore Sculpture Award.

International Trades Fair Award, Birmingham.

The Heredities and Daily Telegraph Awards.

The SEA Sculpture Award for Sculpture. 

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Nick Bibby

Nick Bibby’s sculptures are exquisitely observed. Rich with almost imperceptible subtleties; elevating his art from the merely good to that of a true master.

Nick’s talent, skill, experience and life long dedication to his craft is clearly visible in every piece he sculpts. It is truly rare to find an artist with such ability. The ‘Bibby’ sculptural style,whilst very definitely figurative, is quite unique. Fascinated by both form and detail Nick sculpts with a fluidity and energy that many admire,but few can equal. Simultaneously and apparently effortlessly, combining vivacious energy with a jewel-like attention to detail, resulting in instantly recognisable works of art. In Nick’s eyes, all his subjects are enthralling,wonderful and beautiful, and through his sculpture he strives to encapsulate that beauty and wonder for all to see. As Paul Cézanne once said of Claude Monet, “Only an eye. But what an eye!

”Born in County Durham in 1960, Nick was a precocious talent, drawing and painting as soon as he could hold a pencil, or paintbrush. Even in those very early days, he was drawn towards work in three dimensions. Largely self-taught, Nick has always pursued his own path,constantly pushing himself, seeking new challenges; ever striving towards the un-achievable goal of, ‘Perfection’.

In 1991 Nick produced his first limited edition bronze. A life size Kingfisher, which sold out within a few months,giving him the confidence to move over full time to sculpting and exhibiting bronzes, with his first one man exhibition, at the world renowned Wildlife Art Gallery in Lavenham, Suffolk, two years later. Nick now exhibits work regularly at Muse.The sculpture Company, as well as several other galleries in the UK. In addition, Nick’s works have been exhibited at The Royal Academy of Art, London, The Mall Galleries, London, The Pinacoteca Giovanni e Marella Agnelli, Turin, Leigh Yawkey Woodson Museum of Art, Wisconsin, Sigurjon Olafsson Museum, Reykjavik and the Society of Portrait Sculptors, London

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Tom Hiscocks

Tom of his work says,

……..I hope that my work also reflects aspects of the world that we occupy, so I typically use utilitarian materials – often used in large scale production, and as such taken for granted. Many of us would not give a second thought to Acrylic, but it has qualities and resonances that reflect the areas that I explore in my work (its transparency and its opacity), and those qualities become integral to my work.

Similarly steel has an extraordinary beauty that is overlooked in favour of its utilitarian value. As with acrylic it is massively produced (albeit above levels of current world demand) but we don’t tend to look at what it is –rather at what it does, and that seems to me to reflect how we all too often treat other humans, and perhaps feel viewed ourselves.

So the materials I use bring important resonances.

I also hope that the physicality of the making process brings resonances. I use 3D scanning; computers and laser cutting as tools of my work, and I have learned various fabrication processes from industrial applications. I am just integrating these processes into my practice as a sculptor.

At a practical level this allows me to make work that evolves. I am interested in the birth and evolution of an idea. I tend to start with the question ‘I wonder what happens if..’ rather than ‘I want it to be like…’ It is like finding my own – non-verbal – language to express the aspects of being that I find interesting.

It is a fascinating journey that leads me up many cul-de-sacs, but which also provides access to new insights….

Tom graduated from the Cambridge Art School in June 2013 with a first class honors degree (Fine Art BA). He won the Dr Supanee Gazeley Fine Art Prize in 2013 for his degree show exhibition. Tom’s work has since been exhibited in solo and shared exhibitions across the UK and Europe. His work appears in private and public collections across the UK, Europe and America. 

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